Young Men Trying to Imitate the 9-11 Scenario, Part II

 

What happened to General Aviation after 9-11? Why did we take the ITC away in the late 80's? Why were we hostile with IRS regulations toward Civil Air Patrol pilot owners? What else did this cause and why is it significant to this Part II of aviation mentor-ships for young men? We continue now with Part II of "Young Men trying to imitate the 9-11 Scenario."

When I was in the Boy Scouts explorers we went to Edwards Air force base and toured a B-1 Bomber a year after they came into existence. We toured the factory at Santa Maria CA where they made Aerostar 601s. We went to watch missile launches at Vandenburg Air Force Base. We did all kinds of stuff, cool stuff. Many of us gathered from different high schools, there were only two or three from each high school in the program. Not everyone could come to all events. School things of course got in the way. Some of us were in sports, some in other extracurricular activities. I even had to run a business. I do remember going to those events. I was in the CAP also where we had two Piper Super Cubs, which I had 14 hours in, at really no charge, token, monies and insurance and club dues. All I had to do was study ground school and take aviation tests, which I loved anyway. All this was available to us cadets as we were called through the senior members, because of their gifts due to the tax write offs they received for fuel etc. We marched, went to a shortened version of boot camp. I was athletically inclined, running in boots sucked but it was a good time anyway. They called us names, yelled at us, and taught us discipline and the benefit, they taught us to fly. I was 12-14 at the time. I still think that this program teaches more than any guidance counselor at any school. The counselor at this young man's school did not understand what was a matter with this kid. How could they understand what it means to fly? They are ground lovers.

People who fly think more three demisional, like those who build train sets and run them around their display. American Indians, those in the mountains had much more understanding and intellect than those in the plains. They were forced to view the world differently and with this knowledge a better understanding. They were also better fighters and much harder to defend against as Westward settlers soon found out. A young man who is introduced to flying has a much better chance of understanding what he wants to be when he grows up. Instead we have kids who still have not decided what they want to do until they are a junior in college, if they make it that far. Many do not and all they know is they want to be rich, yet a master of nothing, having learned no real skill or knowledge base to accomplish the goal of living well or even being rich. Not that they would learn it in school anyway, Calvin Coolidge said there are many educated derelicts. Without the training, mentors, knowledge they find as Tom Peter's would say "any road takes them there". And that is where we are today. This young man is not a reflection on our FARs-Federal Aviation Regulations, his actions and death are a reflection of what one of the messages of Ayn Rand was trying to say. It is our society, which breaks down the strength of the individual on their mission to make everyone the same.

End Part II

 



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